Andre Ward shared these philosophical nuggets at a recent press conference in New York City, when I asked him about intimidation and which boxers have tried to intimidate him...

 

"I think most of ‘em have. Even before I got to the championship level. I’ve had guys – Henry Buchanan, he’s a Maryland guy. I fought him in Fresno. And this guy stared at me the whole time. Wherever I saw him, we’d be in a restaurant, he would just stare at me with this look. Edison Miranda. Allan Green. Bika felt like he was gonna come in there and just have his way. Kessler – just being cocky, this young kid, I haven’t watched tapes. It dates back to the amateurs. I would have young fighters come up and see me fight and say, This is Ward?! This is the #1 guy? Ah, he’s nothin. I’ve dealt with this my whole career. Because, for whatever reason, and I could draw a similar reference to Floyd Mayweather – you look at him, you don’t see a hard, mean dude. It looks one way. But then they get in there and it’s no fun. It’s not the kind of fun they thought it was gonna be. With that being said, I respect every opponent. I don’t know how to get cocky and just not respect the guy. Him or anybody. I respect the guys from day one. That’s the way I was raised. But that also causes me to prepare the right way. And if you date back to the days of Sugar Ray Robinson, Sugar Ray Leonard, boxing was a gentleman’s sport. Those guys didn’t push or shove and put on a spectacle in the midst of a press conference. They would go and handle their business. Sugar Ray Robinson was a monster. But he was a gentleman. What I’m saying is, I understand this era we’re in, this UFC era, the MMA era - and I am a fan of MMA, for the record, I’m not bashing MMA – but we’re in a different era. So people think it’s not exciting if that doesn’t happen. Well that’s not true. The man that I am in 2013 is something that I want to be proud to look back on ten or twenty years from now. I want to be able to show my kids, these clips and say, Look at your dad. When I tell them pull your pants up, speak respectfully, go get a job, handle your business, I want them to look back and say, See, my dad did the same thing. What I’m trying to do is bigger than boxing. It’s the man that I want to be. It’s not a front. It’s just who I am. That’s the way I was raised."